Our Post-Election Commitment to Fight for What We Believe

Action Alert

Update: Join us for our Day of Unity and Action on Jan. 20, inauguration day. Come sort food for our community, and take part in a special advocacy workshop.

The results of the election have left many people feeling uncertain. On behalf of our entire Alameda County Community Food Bank community—especially the 311,000 of our neighbors who need and use our services—we are recommitted to fight for what we believe:

• Food is a basic human right.

• Every child, adult and senior should have the opportunity to reach their full potential and live vibrant, productive lives—and good nutrition is essential to success.

• Our community and economy must be inclusive of everyone, regardless of race, gender, ability, how they worship, or who they love, and everyone should have a path to economic prosperity.

Our community is familiar with our innovative food programs. Some are surprised to learn, though, that our efforts also include tireless anti-poverty advocacy. For years, our team has to empowered grassroots campaigns aimed at protecting, restoring, or improving policies that support low-income communities. Alongside a powerful group of advocates, our team closely collaborates with elected officials at every level of government to ensure nutrition and other safety net programs are accessible and sufficient.
This work is only possible with your support.

Now, in such an uncertain political climate, we need your help more than ever. Your commitment—including your voice and enthusiasm—energizes our staff, board, agency partners and all who support us as we pursue a hunger-free community. You may have joined us before as a contributor, a food drive participant or a volunteer. But if you’ve never joined our efforts as an advocate, now’s the time.

If you want to see just how powerful an engaged community can be, look no further than the many positive statewide and local election results. Alameda County voters overwhelmingly approved a significant investment in affordable housing; Oakland, San Francisco and Albany voters approved taxes on sugar sweetened beverages that will fund efforts to address diet-related diseases; and California voters supported measures that will fund education and healthcare. Each of these will have a positive impact on the community we serve.

Hunger is a nonpartisan issue. California policy makers have stated that they will defend California's progress and people, and we are eager to support their efforts. We hope that you will continue to be part of our advocacy on behalf of a well-nourished and prosperous Alameda County.

The first step toward making our community a better place is to nourish our children's, adults' and seniors' bodies and minds. Visit our advocacy page for opportunities to stay engaged. If you’re interested in getting involved, our advocacy team will be happy to speak with you.

 

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